A number of my Midtown New York chiropractic patients engage in CrossFit, and there is good reason as to why. It strengthens your muscles and improves your cardiovascular system at the same time, not to mention that the sessions are generally much shorter than typical workout routines, which makes this form of training preferable to people who don’t want to spend all of their free time in the gym.

So, how does chiropractic fit into the CrossFit picture, making them the perfect pair? Here are three reasons to consider:

#1: Both are Based on Functional Movements

The whole basis of CrossFit is engaging in functional movements to advance your body physically, and the same is true when it comes to chiropractic care. By ensuring that your spinal column is properly aligned and your discs and vertebrae are in place, you’re able to move around more easily. This enhances both regular movements and movements which are a part of your CrossFit sessions.

#2: Both are Designed to Improve Your Quality of Life

The reason most people do CrossFit is because they want to improve their quality of life, whether it be with a better physique or greater overall health. Engaging in chiropractic has the same type of results. For instance, one case study involving a 26-year-old female concluded that, after engaging in chiropractic care, she "appeared to experience improvement in quality of life."

#3: Both Make You Feel Good

Complete a grueling Cross Fit session and you can’t help but feel good about your accomplishment. After receiving a spinal manipulation, those same good thoughts exist because you are taking care of your spinal health and helping your body enhance its overall function in a completely natural way.

If you engage in CrossFit and want to enjoy benefits such as these, contact Dr. Valente’s Midtown New York chiropractic office and schedule an appointment today. CrossFit and chiropractic are definitely the perfect pair.

References

Wenban, AB & Nielsen, MK. (2005, February). Chiropractic maintenance care and quality of life of a patient presenting with chronic low back pain. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 28(2), 136-142. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15800514

 

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